How To Become An Australian Tennis Official

Tennis Officials

Many tennis fans and players want to get more involved with the sport and perhaps put something back into a pass-time time that has given so much to them.

One way of doing that is to become a tennis official and be a crucial part of the on-court action.

There are many clubs in Australia such as Tennis World Chatswood, who will happy to give advice and information to guide you through the formalities.

Who Is Eligible To Be A Coach?

  • You must be 16 years and older
  • Have a passion for the sport
  • Know the rules and regulations of tennis
  • Share the values of Tennis Australia (Teamwork, Loyalty, Humility & Excellence)

What Are The Different Kinds Of Officials?

  • Line Umpires

Line Umpires get to call the shots, from grassroots all the way through to the Australian Open. This job is far more difficult than it looks as it needs maximum concentration for long periods, and of course excellent eyesight.

Becoming a Line Umpire is the quickest pathway to getting on court at tournaments.

  • Chair Umpires

The most important person on court apart from the players, responsible for everything from calling the score to enforcing the rules and handling the players.

A good Chair Umpire needs to communicate well, and have an even temperament under pressure, plus perfect vision. The best umpires are full time, travelling the world with the tour.

  • Court Supervisors

Being a supervisor is a great way to get involved in tennis at grassroots level. They monitor a number of courts in a competition. Assisting players, parents and coaches and help to facilitate the smooth running of a tournament.

Supervisors also help to enforce the rules and court behaviour, as well as resolving disputes on court.

  • Referees

The expert in all things that concern rules and regulations. Referees supervise all aspects of a tournament, from taking charge of the draws and schedules, to enforcing the rules and making sure everything runs smoothly and in the spirit of the game.

Obviously being a referee takes exceptional knowledge of the rules, the ability to multi-task in a pressurised environment, and be fair handed with everybody involved in the tournament.

  • Chief Of Officials

This position is only available to the most experienced of officials, the position entails coordinating all the other officials, and works with the competition to ensure officials are always on hand when required.

Only the largest of tennis events need a Chief of Officials such as the Australian Open, AO Series and the ATP Challenger events.

How To Become An Official

  1. Register your interest with Tennis Australia
  2. Attend an officiating course
  3. Gain experience in state or territory competitions
  4. Gain your accreditation
  5. Become a Tennis Australia Official Member
  6. Continue to develop

By pursuing this path you will help grow the game in Australia and add your own special contribution to the development of the sport.